Mastering Home Staging Design

Home staging design is not as difficult as it sounds. You see, the big difference between interior design and home staging is essentially the goal of each activity.

When a home owner embarks on interior design, they want the house to reflect their own personality and desires. But when a person engages in home staging, they avoid reflecting any aspect of their personality so that the home has a broad and universal appeal.

During home staging, each of the changes in your house should be done to improve your home’s attraction to potential buyers.

Home staging guidelines

The home staging process might take a few weeks to complete, but the changes needed inside your home are not hard to accomplish. Here are some guidelines:

1. If you don’t have the funds for buying new cabinets, it’s time to maximize the buyer appeal of your existing cabinetry. Remove all of your cabinets and clean the old installation spots. Have the room repainted before putting the cabinets back.

Clean the cabinets thoroughly. If the cabinets are from the kitchen, the surface of the wood will have a thin grease film from all the cooking vapors that you produce during your normal use of the space.

Remove the grease film with a wood-safe de-greasing agent. Sand the cabinets and apply a generous layer of accent paint or varnish, whichever is best.

2. You can make the best possible impression on potential buyers if you create a visual atmosphere that is young, fresh, and vibrant. No one likes to live in a house that looks, smells, and feels ten or fifteen years old.

When a person is out to buy a house for their family or for themselves, they want a property where they can start fresh. So it’s very important to remove all traces of occupancy, including worn counter tops.

You have several options when dealing with old counter tops. The ideal option is also the most expensive: have the old counter tops removed so that granite can be put in.

The second option produces good results (for the price) but isn’t as expensive as the first option: Formica or laminate counter tops.

The third option is also the newest approach: non-invasive resurfacing. Ask your private contractor about these three options and pick the one that suits your needs and budget.

3. Since you are already moving out after the sale of your home, it won’t hurt to buy new appliances. Pick nice appliances and put these in your home for showcasing. Just make sure that you tell the buyer that the appliances are not part of the package and are just there for showcasing purposes only.

Now, if you want to buy even better appliances, you may want to consider buying new appliances, increasing the price of the home to include the cost of buying new appliances (plus interest), and then buying better appliances for your new home.

4. Take a look at your bathroom – does it look like a million dollars to you? If not, you may want to have the tiles, lighting, and bathroom fixtures removed and replaced. Adding a vanity space to your bathroom will also boost the overall value of your property.

Importance of Medical Coding for Insurance

With health and diseases becoming a major issue these days around the world, it has become A LOT more important to have more and more coders involved in the medical field for insurance. But what is medical coding? A medical coder, clinical coding officer, or diagnostic coder are professionals involved in the health care sector who analyze clinical documents and using proper classification systems, assign standard codes to them. They provide medical coding guidelines and suggestions to help regulate the ways doctors, nurses, and other medical staff provide care for their patients. There are three main types of medical coding:

1) ICD (International Classification of Diseases): These are codes used for describing the cause of illness, injury, or death.

2) CPT (Current Procedural Terminology): These deal with anesthesia, surgery, pathology, radiology, measurement procedures, and new technological changes in the medical field.

3) HCPCS Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System): These include outpatient hospital care, medical aid, and Medicare.

Let us look at some points as to why coding is necessary for the medical field.

DATA SYSTEMS
When the coding is paired with the data systems of the hospitals, a powerful tool is made. By doing so, a large number of data from various hospitals, clinics, and other sources are stored, accessed, and used from one large online data system. This implementation helps in the transfer of any patient’s data from any hospital to another for any medical purpose. This information helps doctors to be more connected and make wiser decisions, especially in cases involving the life and death situation of the patient.

PATIENT CARE

Coding is very much required for reimbursements, which include submitting medical claims with insurance companies and bills between insurers and patients. The transfer of information for bill related purposes requires medical records, patient’s medical needs, lab results, pathology records (if any), and any other related documents. Appropriate payment is possible only when the required diagnostic codes are put in place, which also means to verify in case the medical claim is denied by the insurance company.

REGULATIONS

Medical billing and coding fall under the rules and guidelines of many countries and states. Coders in this field are also responsible for protecting the privacy of the patients and their families. They are supposed to take safeguards to preserve the confidential details concerning the patient and his/her medical background in a safe place. Electronic medical records fall under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes issued by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Medical coding analysts are in the front line in healthcare data analytics. They work in many types of healthcare setups and not necessarily in hospitals and clinics. Their valuable service is very functional for research and development in the medical field.

Insurance Agency Lead Scoring

Many insurance agencies have not yet formalized their lead scoring system. This is a worthwhile endeavor for all agencies, and one which should be revisited every year, while tracking the return on investment of their marketing programs.

What is lead scoring? It is a methodology used to rank prospects against a scale, and then assign a value to determine interest level and distribution. For example, let’s say a trucking insurance lead appointment arrives at your agency. This lead is with an owner of 15 power units, they use company drivers, and they are unhappy with their carrier. Perhaps your lead scoring system falls on a 1 to 10 scale, and this lead is scored an 8. What might receive a higher score? And what types of leads are outside of profile, and what score would they receive? Perhaps prospects need to score an 8 to appear on your producer scorecards.

Is the lead distributed to producers by territory? Does your lead handling process vary by type of lead, product or prospect? For example, are commercial leads separated by large and small business, by industry or product? Are benefit leads parsed by groups over and under 50? And does your agency have a tracking system in place to determine how many leads showed for the appointment, moved into the pipeline, received quotes and ultimately convert into new business?

Salespeople, sales managers, producers and other business people often refer to prospects in vague terms such as: new, warm, hot, cold, likely, qualified, etc. These terms do little to better understand a sales pipeline or convey likelihood of purchase to other members of the team. Agencies can consider creating a simple prospect scorecard to resolve this issue and quantify their lead scoring. Formalizing lead scoring offers benefits such as:

Helps Producers create ideal attributes to form a buyer persona
Creates a simple numeric system to leverage your buyer persona
Assigns numeric values to rank your best prospects
Creates a simple qualification acronym to determine likelihood to close

What should be included in a prospect scorecard?

Use a prospect scorecard to quantify your approach to pipeline building. Some attributes of your ideal client might include revenue, growth rate, client type (business or consumer) and market niche. For example, are you targeting companies with $5m to $10m in revenue? Are your best prospects fast-growing firms, trucking companies, manufacturers or consumers?

If you’re selling to consumers, are they high net worth, middle-income, millennials or senior citizens? Are your prospects in a specific niche market such as banking, insurance, biotech, consulting, education, etc.? Create a scorecard with your ideal attributes and a customized qualification abbreviation to help you determine if you’re selling to an in-profile prospect.

Insurance agencies and brokers seeking to get to the next level with their insurance marketing and lead generation, but lacking the internal resources to achieve their marketing goals, can reach out to a proficient insurance agency marketing firm.